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Thread: Giles's Nova

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, England
    Posts
    963

    Re: Giles's Nova

    JOB 5 continued...
    Bonnet Catch


    Just a quick update. These lovely little aluminium things I found in my box of tricks are just perfect for supporting the bonnet latch pull cable where it enters the bonnet space and runs along the side wall to the catch. Here they are primed and spray painted...











    OTHER THINGS

    Below are photos of the stereo I have just taken delivery of. I looked all over in the hope of finding one like the beautiful Kenwood system that I bought for the TVR Chimaera I owned a few years ago, which was minimal and classy and had a slight retro look about it.

    I did not want a plasticy shell with flashing colourful lights and graphics dancing about on the screen, which is what 99% of today's car stereo's seem to be like. I'm so glad I found this as it's lovely to look at, has white backlights which will match the Nova's new instruments, has brushed steel surround and knobs and it can work with my iPhone and iPod. It also just happens to be Pioneer's current flagship model and gets excellent reviews.

    It's tested our patience but now the Mark 4 dashboard and heater assembly allow it to fit nicely (more on that to come)...











    JOB 11
    Dashboard


    Here are the new dashboard instruments...



    I decided on: Speedo, Tacho, Fuel, Water Temp and Oil Pressure.


    and here are the warning lights and some of the switches...



    From the back left to right: Engine start button (also found on current Noble M400), toggle switch with flick cover - for hydraulic roof 'manual' or 'remote control' select, 'up' and 'down' switch for roof 'manual' control.

    In the foreground: Warning lights - indicators, oil pressure, charge, Alfa engine 'I'm now nicely warmed up so you can put your foot down' light, main beam.

    To be continued...

  2. #22

    Re: Giles's Nova

    Hi, just wondering how those push button start systems work, do you get rid of the key?
    Wouldnt mind putting one in my car, just concerned security wise.

  3. #23

    Re: Giles's Nova

    You can get rid of the key with a push button system, think of the key as just a switch, but with more ons and offs! I had one on my Ford Probe which had been fitted. you still needed the key in the lock to undo the column lock, and also there was a security reader ring which recognised the key, but all ignition was on a switch, so you switched it on and ignition circuits were ON, then pushed a button (MOM ON) for the starter. When I bought the Avante it had a push button, the key was retained for ignition and instead of turning the key the final turn for starter, that was done by the button, but the button would not do anything without ignition of course, so again you needed the key.
    Follow my Avante Build - Target = Stoneleigh 2012 Definitely!!

  4. #24

    Re: Giles's Nova

    Yes I did think you would need the key, I think ill just keep the key starter, bit pointless having a button when you could just turn the key one more click. It would be pretty cool if they made a system with a seperate key so you could remove the key from the column.

  5. #25

    Re: Giles's Nova

    Yep, it was pretty cool, but pointless I had the ignition switch and the push button starter hidden in the ash tray of the Probe. The push button starter was where the lighter would normally have been. Yes it was fun to get in the car, flip open the ash tray, and push the button to start. However, a further turn of the key would do the job just the same. Thinking back though, i think the guy who put this arrangement in the Probe did so because someone, maybe him, had smashed the key barrel, so there was actually no column lock, and the key just sat in the keyhole to activate the immobiliser.
    Follow my Avante Build - Target = Stoneleigh 2012 Definitely!!

  6. #26

    Re: Giles's Nova

    I can either use the switch or key to turn Ign on, but only the button will start and you have to look for that but still in easy reach of my hand.
    http://jimsnova.page.tl/
    Club Nova / avante membership 031

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, England
    Posts
    963

    Re: Giles's Nova

    Hi Chris, I think you've had your question answered already. It is a bit of a gimmick really; I could just turn the key one more turn. I'm actually toying with the idea of not using it and just using the key. Not having it saves on more wiring and an extra relay. There is something nice about pushing a button to start the engine though. I'm going to have a think about it...

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    East Riding
    Posts
    1,212

    Re: Giles's Nova

    I have no key, I removed the steering lock and the ignition is on the same remote as the canopy so you need the remote to open/close the canopy and turn on the ignition and then a push button to start.

    Dirk

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, England
    Posts
    963

    Re: Giles's Nova

    JOB 11
    Dashboard continued...


    Over the last 5 weeks my helper Jono and I have been working hard on preparing the Mark 4 dashboard for the Nova. This dashboard requires a lot of modification to make it look good and work well in the Nova.

    I had already worked hard on it about 8 years ago, which included sanding down and spraying the instrument panel sections silver and making a former, mould and final panel for the cover section.

    Here's how the dashboard looked (from the work done on it 8 years ago) before we started any work this time round....




    Here follows is our recently completed work:


    Making a bracket to support the dashboard wiring loom...







    With that in place, we know the lengths of the cables and can wire up the dashboard from any location, other than in the car, which wouldn't be very comfortable.


    Making windscreen vent heater outlet holes...

    This stage was tricky and we had to get it right first time. The first photo shows one of two vents I chose from the Car Builder Solutions catalogue. I wanted vents that opened and closed shut, rocked left and right and to and forth and also had a built in round outlet flange at the bottom for air tubing. Ideally they would have been better wider, but my choice was extremely limited despite endless searching online.

    We had to very carefully cut two perfect holes but leave corner tabs. This was difficult because the area we chose to cut was on an angle. We wanted the vents to sit at about 45 degrees so that the air from the heater blower would hit the windscreen in the perfect place - not straight at the glass at the bottom (only for the air to deflect right off), but 'hitting it' at a gentle angle further up.

    The mark 4 dashboard comes with 'indents' which are presumably for vent holes to be cut out, but I worked out that at that angle they would only be blowing air directly to the drivers and passengers face rather than the windscreen.





    (in this photo you can see that in order to fit standard size instruments, a hole needs to be cut out, in this case where the tachometer and other small guage lights fouled the fibreglass.)




    (in this photo you can see all the instruments and switches in place. All the holes for these were cut out about 8 years ago)


    Preparing to cut the other side. Things were going well...




    Trial fitment...








    If you look at either side of the vents you will see a big gap which of course appears when cutting through an angle. We planned for this and the next stage was to make fibreglass (P40) side bits...



    (protecting the nice panels prior to using P40 and filler)


    Side bits done, now to fill the existing indents and make smooth...












    Cleaned up and looking good...








    View from in the Nova...





    It's difficult to tell by the photos but we are confident that the position of these vents will expell the air perfectly aganst the Nova windscreen.


    Removing fibreglass
    The next job was to improve on all the returns as there was far too much fibreglass on both sides. We also improved on all the curved edges by carefully filing away. The next photo shows me cutting off a load of fibreglass from one side (I can make myself invisible you know)...




    Taking shape...




    More improving
    Next, we sanded down the return edges of the smooth silver panels and also filled other areas that required 'flattening'.

    This was required by the trimmer who had already said that it would be an "absolute nightmare to trim"! I told him "you should look forward to the challenge. It's not everyday one gets the most beautiful looking car in the world to work on"








    Dashboard top cover

    We started to see light at the end of the tunnel and moved on to sorting out the top panel which needed shaping along it's back edge and around the right windscreen vent. The longest job however was trying to get rid of the unslighly gap between where the bottom of the dash cover meets the top of the dashboard instrument section. We somehow needed to bridge the gap in order to fill it, but it was impossible to get to from anywere.

    This is one of these things where one thinks "can I be bothered?" and "will anyone notice?" It's all too easy to be like this isn't it? We had a beer and decided that there's no point in getting this far only to make a shortcut of this area. So, we decided to keep the standard high.

    I came up with the idea of squirting expandable foam through holes drilled into the top cover after using duct tape to form an angled 'bridge'.

    First here is the cover...








    Cut out for the windscreen vent...






    Time for expandable foam (I hate this stuff)...







    That last photo shows the tape in place and all the foam blobs on the top of the other photos is where the foam, squirted through loads of holes drilled into the top, has erupted back out!

    The next stage involved waiting for it to dry (overnight) and then prising it off, looking in disbelief, groaning and swearing.

    Basically what had happend is that it didn't fully cure probably due to lack of air(?) and as such the underside of the top cover was covered in sticky foam. The good news was that after tossing it to one side, the foam began to cure.

    To cut a long story short, it worked, after a bit of sanding and cutting back. We had our foam 'backing' to fill against, although much of the foam that went all over the rest of the underside of the top cover was scraped off as it wasn't needed...

    We then sanded, filled, sanded, filled, filed and filed some more until it was perfect. I then sprayed it with filler primer...









    In the last photo you can see the edge we were trying all along to achieve. Beforehand, that edge had a huge gap running along it about an inch high in places.

    I'm really pleased with the results.

    To follow is the final stages: Priming the flat silver panels, spraying them with silver again - this time using enamel paint, and finally laquering them.

    Then it's off to the trimmers!

    ...and then the wiring

    To be continued...

  10. #30

    Re: Giles's Nova

    Very nice! I'm always impressed on how folks find creative solutions to common problems. The dashboard is looking great - can't wait to see it trimmed out!

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