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Thread: Nova Kitcar Subaru flat-six PPC magazine project car or scoobynova.

  1. #471
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    Some serious prep work, I think that chassis will last forever. Nice one.

    Dirk

  2. #472
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    Next job on the list is to re-fit the rear torsion bars, adjustable spring plates (Pic) IRS trailing arms + all bushes.

    When I removed the torsion bars, I noted which was left & right, but not the (rotation) position on the splines, that shouldn't be a showstopper with Adj. spring plates (right?).

    SpringPlates.jpg

    My ride height at the back will be quite a bit lower than stock, so I plan on installing the spring plate closer to the horizontal, maybe one full spline lower than stock, with the adjusting screw set to allow mostly (2/3) downward adjustment from there.

    I see the Torque spec for the IRS trailing arm pivot Bolt is 87 Ft/Lb, although I probably won't torque everything up at this stage...

    Any tips & tricks on putting this lot together?

    Maybe I should install the rear wheel bearings beforehand, with the trailing arms on the bench? Any thoughts?

  3. #473
    Senior Member Phill's Avatar
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    I set mine up by trial and error due to the fact when I bought the car the spring plates had already been messed around with and the car sat lopsided. I eventually got my car to sit level by measuring how far the end of the plate was off the ground when in it's relaxed position (off the step) and setting the opposite side up to match this measurement (obviously you need to ensure that the axle stands are the same height and in the same position at either side to ensure the car is level to the ground when doing this work).

    However, I didn't have the benefit of adjustable spring plates so it was a lot of trial and error until I eventually got the ride height to my satisfaction, so you should find this a lot easier.

    A good rule of thumb is to start off with the spring plate in its relaxed state (i.e off the step) is sitting so that the lower set screw hole is visible (and not partialy covered) just below the edge of the plate and that this position is the same on both sides.

    You're probably already aware that a combination of inner and outer rotations of the torsion bar allows for an almost infinite range of adjustment due to the fact there are differing numbers of splines on either end of the torsion bars.

    Hope the above makes sense?

    However, bear in mind my car has swing axles and not IRS so the suggested position of the spring plate relative to the set screw hole may be different?
    Last edited by Phill; 20-01-2020 at 04:03 PM. Reason: added more info
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  4. #474
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    Useful - thanks, even though I have the adjusters, I will sync-up the bars using that technique before fitting them.

  5. #475
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    This is the trailing arm pivot bush on an IRS car;

    Pivot_Bush.jpg

    My question is which surface is supposed to move/slide, and against which? (i.e. when the wheel moves up and down)

    I assume the bush and the trailing arm itself are locked together, as the fitting is very tight.
    Does the bush spin on the ~25mm metal tube within the bush, i.e. the tube is fixed, the arm & bush move?

  6. #476
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    This is the trailing arm pivot bush on an IRS car;

    Pivot_Bush.jpg

    My question is which surface is supposed to move/slide, and against which? (i.e. when the wheel moves up and down)

    I assume the bush and the trailing arm itself are locked together, as the fitting is very tight.
    Does the bush spin on the ~25mm metal tube within the bush, i.e. the tube is fixed, the arm & bush move?
    Even torqued up as high as it is the forces applied will undo the nut which is why the original bolts are peened and newer types are clamped by some method. You know all this, on an old car the bolt and center steel tube corrode and are a bugger to separate kind of suggesting they do not rotate and wear, the majority of the torque is applied to the center of the bush and other than the bush going through the arm which is tight, there is only a few mm of side pressure applied to the arm. So my money is the arm rotates around the bush. I may be wrong either way all the metal parts on mine had a smear of copper easy over them when I installed them.

    Dirk

  7. #477
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    I had a good weekend and got the trailing arms built, bashed in the new inner and outer bearings, seals, EMPI brake mount, the only glitch was the goopy paint on some mounting flanges which had to be scraped away to get some of the part to bed-in together. The pivot bolt bushes were pushed in with G-Clamp.

    The whole arm is pretty heavy and the caliper is still to go on, unsprung weight at the rear will be high.




    I've learned that the car has Porsche 944 trailing arms. The vendor said it when I purchased the car, but I thought he was wrong because they look *exactly* like stock VW ones.

    Apparently on the 944 arms the mount points for the spring plates are different, and you can see it below; one big hole in the middle of the mount point, 2x 12mm holes and one smaller hole 10-11mm at the forward edge. I read online that there are strengthening plates within them(?). These are early 944 arms the later ones were different.


  8. #478
    Owners Register Admin & Euro-Nova Supporter BlueNova's Avatar
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    Looking brand new! Love the contrasting colour rather than usual black.

  9. #479
    Keep an eye on ploy bushes, they crumble, I know.

    The ride height UNLOADED is more to do with the arm stops on the horns rather than arm loading which comes into force under load. I have 10mm stops on mine so the axle is level unloaded but the ride height when driven and off the stops is set by the torsion rate.
    So you can set the ride height static but the driven height as two settings or if you set the arms for a low ride height they will be too soft, limit travel and bottom out.



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  10. #480
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    I have installed the adjustable spring plates at the weekend, but not before some fun and games trying to work out the preload...

    Depending on who you ask, the stock preload (the angle that you install the spring plate) is pointing down 20 degrees from horizontal, this allows the car to sit at the correct ride height under it's own weight.
    I set mine to 10 degrees, and sync'd up the bars on both sides; and installed my adjustable plates.

    Then the next day, I thought better of it, removed them and tweaked the bar back just over 3 degrees, so I ended up with ~13 Degrees pre-load (i.e 1 inch higher than the initial attempt).

    Although my spring plates are adjustable, they adjust across quite a narrow range and need to be installed in the right ballpark to be effective. This pic shows the 3.20 degrees I added to the preload:








    Before fitting the trailing arms I installed the Subarugears front gearbox crossmember. It bolts into the 2 sockets used by the trailing arms with with 4x M12 bolts, so it's bombproof. The wobbly lines (Pic) are where I had to ‘adjust’ it to clear the chassis tunnel. I used Bilt Hamber Dynax UC Clear chassis wax on top of the powdercoat for added protection.




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