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Thread: Nova Kitcar Subaru flat-six PPC magazine project car or scoobynova.

  1. #271
    Nice approach Steve, wish I had the 3D CAD skills to do such stuff. Should help keep the ducting under the dash nice and tidy

  2. #272
    Wel done Steve and good to see it in the context where it will be fitted. Sorry I couldn't print this for you as the print bed on my printer is too small. Shapeways provide an excellent service and I'm sure you won't be disspointed.
    "The most beautiful kit car in the world - Motor"

    http://stores.lulu.com/rightsigns


  3. #273
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    Thanks gents. To get something (e.g. a Vent) 3D printed, you don't need to have CAD Software skills, or your own Printer for that matter. You can outsource these tasks - although it is a more expensive option of course.

    The 3D designer that produced the CAD model for the Vent (above) lives in Serbia. I came up with the design, and produced a sample using cardboard & foam, I took pics from various angles and emailed them to him, we quickly fine-tuned the design between us, and he produced an .stl file which I uploaded to Shapeways for Production.

    The beauty of CAD + 3D Printing is that if you like my design of vent, you can take the .stl file and print a couple for yourself. You can also take the design, improve it, and print it for yourself.

    A handful of owners have already posted 3D print designs on this forum; Logos, Steering wheel 'cap', and a light/indicator mount for the MK1 undertray. I plan on using all of these designs in either original or modified form.
    With 3D printing, there is an upfront cost for the original designer, but thereafter all owners can benefit from a well thought-out design.

    I look forward to seeing more 3D parts becoming available via this forum ;-)

  4. #274
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    Goodbye Flatlands

    It's been a busy few days for the PPC Nova!

    The wheels arrived, the rear tyres arrived on a boat from the USA,
    add in a covered trailer from West sussex, and the planets aligning over Kings Lynn...
    Anyway the chassis was duly delivered to my Dad's Garage in South London.
    He was delighted.

    As you can see, the chassis is a rolling chassis, it is at the dry-build stage,
    But it's unpainted. Why? Flatlands are reducing their VW footprint in 2019,
    and the car has run out of time.
    Well, it wouldn't be a Nova build without some bumps in the road ;-)

    I will be strpping-down the chassis, prepping and painting it myself.
    I'll probably need some small welding jobs doing before that, but more on that later.



  5. #275
    Senior Member BlueNova's Avatar
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    It's looking great Steve!! What a Christmas present you've got there .... enjoy the holidays!!

    Alistair

    PS ... remember to fit a cover plate to the front of the frame head. I noticed my cover plate was missing when I lifted the body to expose the chassis, and I'm convinced that was why my frame head bottom plate was so rusty!
    Last edited by BlueNova; 24-12-2018 at 07:52 PM.

  6. #276
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    Looking good, hopefully you will get lots done over the holiday.

    Dirk

  7. #277
    I'm sure you are excited. Its a shame they didn't get to paint the chassis for you, it really does look truly special the way they get the finish, especially with all your nice bits and bobs on it.

    One option is that you could always do the strip down yourself and take it to the same place they get their stuff painted if you wanted that top notch finish.

  8. #278
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueNova View Post
    PS ... remember to fit a cover plate to the front of the frame head. I noticed my cover plate was missing when I lifted the body to expose the chassis, and I'm convinced that was why my frame head bottom plate was so rusty!
    Come to think of it I think mine is missing too, I'l have to address that. Good tip Alistair

  9. #279
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    Thanks gents;
    I am in the process of disassembling the chassis, everything that can be unbolted, will be.
    Then I'll prep for paint.
    I plan on using POR15 on the chassis and maybe the POR15 seam sealer as well.
    looking at the blurb for POR15, it is recommended for use on bare metal, my chassis part bare metal, part paint (the floorpans) some grey primer, so the question is how do I prep it?
    I was looking at sand (or salt) blasting to get the chassis back to metal, I may even do this myself as the kit is pretty cheap. Plan B is using a chemical paint stripper...
    What is the best way forward here?
    Any thoughts?


  10. #280
    Senior Member BlueNova's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    Thanks gents;
    I am in the process of disassembling the chassis, everything that can be unbolted, will be.
    Then I'll prep for paint.
    I plan on using POR15 on the chassis and maybe the POR15 seam sealer as well.
    looking at the blurb for POR15, it is recommended for use on bare metal, my chassis part bare metal, part paint (the floorpans) some grey primer, so the question is how do I prep it?
    I was looking at sand (or salt) blasting to get the chassis back to metal, I may even do this myself as the kit is pretty cheap. Plan B is using a chemical paint stripper...
    What is the best way forward here?
    Any thoughts?

    Hi Steve,

    I used a combination of sand blasting (I've only got a small sand blaster) for awkward areas, angle grinder flapper discs for stubborn relatively flat areas and wire brush drill attachments for the easier flat areas like the protective paint on the new floorpans. Might have been easier to just sand blast the whole lot with a more robust sand blaster, but I'm happy with the finish I achieved.

    Personally, I don't like chemical paint strippers so would not recommend that option. When you get round to sealing and painting, don't forget to treat all the 'internal' areas like the tunnel, the rear horns, the frame head, and that extra box section you added to the chassis to mount the body on.

    Hope you're enjoying being more hands on with your build.

    Cheers, Alistair

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