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Thread: Wiring loom

  1. #1
    Senior Member Phill's Avatar
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    Wiring loom

    I'm looking for advice on wiring my car

    Any recommendations on where to buy a complete loom from? I'm thinking of buying a basic loom from VW heritage, Limebug or Machine 7 - all three offer a basic kit to wire a buggy and I was thinking I could add to it to wire up the roof section.

    To be honest I'm a bit apprehensive about it all. When I built my original Nova back in the 80's I bought a loom from Nova Kit cars and it was just a case of following the instructions and plugging it all together and it all worked first time. This time I suspect I'm going to have to do a lot more work building the loom itself so would appreciate any advice offered?
    "The most beautiful kit car in the world - Motor"

    http://stores.lulu.com/rightsigns


  2. #2
    ***Euro-Nova Supporter***
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    I was in the same boat as I had never wired or built a loom before.
    So I started with working out what fusebox I wanted ( the one CBS provide is brilliant).
    Then I worked out where I wanted it to go and used their wiring diagram to do the basics.
    I then broke my loom down into five sections and built them separately.
    Front loom for lights .
    Rear loom for lights.
    Loom for engine management.
    Loom for interior.
    Loom for roof.
    If you do it by sections it makes it so much easier to get your head around.

    Buffy

  3. #3
    Senior Member Phill's Avatar
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    That's excellent advice Mark. I don't have any problem lashing up temporary wiring to power the roof or start the engine, so I reckon that by breaking the loom down into smaller manageable sections will make the job much easier
    "The most beautiful kit car in the world - Motor"

    http://stores.lulu.com/rightsigns


  4. #4
    Senior Member BlueNova's Avatar
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    Excellent idea for a thread Phill. It'll be a while till I get to that stage (progress is really slow here!!) but the mice ate bits of my old loom, so at some stage I'll be looking at fitting a new one. I'll be following this thread with great interest!
    Alistair

  5. #5
    I knew nuts about wiring when I started doing my loom from scratch 25+ odd years ago. I got a large piece of hardboard and took over one of the bedrooms in my parents house. I measured the length of where I wanted various things to be in the car then mapped this out onto the hardboard as a pin board.

    As Mark says if you go circuit by circuit it really isn't that hard, its just time consuming, especially if you go the "belts and braces" route of crimping and soldering all joints and connectors. One thing I wouldn't do again is use that Spiral Loom Wrap stuff again, it does protect the loom but is an absolute pain in the A#$% when you decide to add or take away stuff as wrapping and unwrapping is a real pain. The split conduit that its available these days is the route I would take to protect the loom if I were to do it again.

    Another challenge I had back then was that it wasn't so easy to find suppliers and get all the different coloured wires, so my loom is largely 3 colours only ). I used special adhesive wrap around labels with numbers for each circuit (putting the numbers on the ends and periodically along the circuit) to identify the wires. 25+ years later they are luckily still there (mostly). These days they even do heat shrink with numbers, so no chance of those falling off if you go that route.

  6. #6
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    Hi all.
    I went down the same route as Buffy. CBS sell a pre wired board with fuses & relays all on one unit. All at the correct rating.

    I did the wiring on the car with wiring running in flexible copex.

    Again like Buffy you can work on small jobs. But have an over all plan for when you need to add the extras into a run.

    In the past I've used a buggy wiring kit on a buggy funny enough but found I ended up making changes to it anyway.

    which ever route you take. Take your time. That way you'll enjoy it as it comes alive

    Cheers.
    Mostin.
    “A plan is only a means of measuring where things went wrong”

  7. #7
    Senior Member Phill's Avatar
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    Is this the fusebox you guys reccomend? :-
    https://www.carbuildersolutions.com/...-wiring-module
    "The most beautiful kit car in the world - Motor"

    http://stores.lulu.com/rightsigns


  8. #8
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    Hi Phil.

    Yep that's the I used. I think Buffy used the same one as well.

    Each screw connection is numbered & there's a simple diagram giving you examples of what type of basic circuit that goes to each.

    There's a cover for it which comes separately.

    Cheers.
    Mostin.
    “A plan is only a means of measuring where things went wrong”

  9. #9
    ***Euro-Nova Supporter***
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    That's the one I used also.
    Perfect for wiring novices ...

  10. #10
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    If you are going to use any sort of crimp connectors make sure you have the correct ratchet crimp tool and do not solder the connectors. It might be a bit expensive but will last a life time and do a much better job.

    Dirk

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