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Thread: Heat-shrink crimp connections from 12v planet

  1. #1
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    Heat-shrink crimp connections from 12v planet

    I am looking electrical connectors for a home-brew wiring loom:
    I like these heat-shrink blade connections from 12v planet.

    These are crimped; the crimp tool is shown in the middle of the page,
    any thoughts?

    https://www.12voltplanet.co.uk/63mm-...ue-yellow.html

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    My personal preference for spade connectors is uninsulated with the correct tool and boots if you want to then add shrink wrap then do that as well. I usually put a bit of dielectric grease on the connector once finished to avoid corrosion.

    Dirk

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    I'm a fan of heat shrink sleeves, they're more likely to stay where you put it
    The crimping tool might do the job but I personally prefer the type that forces an indent into the crimp, they seem to reduce the chance of the wire pulling out of the crimped fitting. (Clickme to see example)

    Its not bad, but if you're wanting to spend out, you may want to consider one with interchangeable jaws like in the following examples (each name in brackets is a link):
    (KennedyRatchet Crimping Tool C/w Interchangeable Jaws 8PC(£52.99) or
    (Paron® JX-D5301 Multifunctional Ratchet Crimping Tool Wire Strippers Terminals Pliers Kit £22.89)
    Last edited by Gaisa; 07-11-2019 at 11:46 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Phill's Avatar
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    I bought my crimping tool from screwfix and it did a first class job:- https://www.screwfix.com/p/crimping-tool-9/3137v

    You will also need a wire stripper - I had an older crimp tool which I bought from maplins years ago that included a wire stripper as part of its design, but it didn't put an indent into the crimp which as Gaisa has already mentioned produces a more secure crimp.

    I put off wiring my car for ages being concerned that it would be difficult. In fact I found it to be one of the most satisfying aspects of the entire build. It only looks complicated when you look at the job as a whole, but if you break the loom down into smaller sections it's actually very simple and straightforward.

    I compiled a list of documents and notes (much of it from the Nova club modifications manual) when I did my car and saved them as a single file which you can download from here. It also includes my own wiring diagrams which I kept for future reference:- https://drive.google.com/open?id=1iJ...37N5iny3HXOd6x
    "The most beautiful kit car in the world - Motor"

    http://stores.lulu.com/rightsigns


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    Thanks folks - good info all round there.

  6. #6
    I would like to add my 2 pence worth if I could.

    The crimp connectors from 12v would be ok, but in my mind (and the mind of the mechanic who helped me with my motorbike resto) are a bit of a bodge job look.

    My personal preference would also be un-insulated connectors with heat shrink applied. Solder the wire as well to give a lasting connection and use a good quality ratchet crimp tool for un-insulated crimps (as different tool for insulated).

    There are a couple of sites I used to buy terminals from:

    Auto electrical supplies and vehicle wiring products (sorry can’t remember web addresses off hand but if you google the names they will come up)

    Happy wiring.

    G

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    Quote Originally Posted by GReaper View Post
    I would like to add my 2 pence worth if I could.

    The crimp connectors from 12v would be ok, but in my mind (and the mind of the mechanic who helped me with my motorbike resto) are a bit of a bodge job look.

    My personal preference would also be un-insulated connectors with heat shrink applied. Solder the wire as well to give a lasting connection and use a good quality ratchet crimp tool for un-insulated crimps (as different tool for insulated).

    There are a couple of sites I used to buy terminals from:

    Auto electrical supplies and vehicle wiring products (sorry can’t remember web addresses off hand but if you google the names they will come up)

    Happy wiring.

    G

    A very good point!
    Sleeveless crimps are definitely stronger and soldering them is a good touch too!
    Doing that and coating them with heat shrink may seem like an excessive load of effort, but they look cleaner and last much longer.
    Oh, and those interchangeable jaw ratchet tools I posted include jaws for sleeveless crimps
    And one of them includes a set of strippers


    (That's wire strippers!)

  8. #8
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    Soldering a crimp connector is the worst thing you can do, it makes the connection brittle in a high vibration application like a car.

    Dirk

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirk View Post
    Soldering a crimp connector is the worst thing you can do, it makes the connection brittle in a high vibration application like a car.

    Dirk
    I bow to your knowledge Dirk. I only had to do a few connections so it wouldn’t have mattered about that. If doing a full wiring loom then I suppose as you say, vibration will play more of a part.

    G

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirk View Post
    Soldering a crimp connector is the worst thing you can do, it makes the connection brittle in a high vibration application like a car.

    Dirk
    I stand corrected and educated

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