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Thread: More on 3D Printing

  1. #1
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    More on 3D Printing

    Quote Originally Posted by islandman View Post
    Steve, you seem to have mastered custom 3D printed parts. From your earlier posts you mocked them up and sent them away to be printed, is that still the case or have you mastered CAD now? As I'm trying to figure out how you could explain to someone remote how you wanted that part to turn out? I'm looking to learn something here for custom parts I may need

    Hi Dave,
    Yes I am a big fan of 3D printing, but as a consumer - I don't have a printer and have not played with/learned CAD software. That is for the Hardcore Guys ;-)
    IMO this is a job that suits being outsourced, and I'm looking to outsource my build where possible.


    There are 3 stages to getting something 3D printed:

    1) Establishing the spec/dimensions of the item - That's all on you.
    2) Design/Creating a .STL file. This is done on CAD software (The .STL is basically a computer readable version of your spec)
    3) Getting the item printed.


    I use a freelance Design/Print guy in the UK who has his own kit, who does 2 & 3 for me.

    I have not had problems getting my thoughts/spec across to the designer. For some items I made a cardboard model photographed it from various angles writing the dimensions on the pictures (example below).

    Yesterday my Shock Covers arrived, the 'Spec' I sent the Designer (using Microsoft Paint) is below,
    I asked him to make the design a bit more interesting and he came up with the lettering and horizontal ridges. So a designer can work from not much more than a back-of-an-envelope specification. And in my experience can add value to the design.
    e.g. I was not aware you could print an item in 2 colours until my torsion bar End Caps arrived (Pic).


    When the .STL file is produced, the designer will email it to you before printing, it can bounce back and forth as you iron out any issues.


    You can print your item in different plastics (this is a big subject) e.g. some are more robust, some are UV tolerant, my Design/Print guy recommends a material and I generally go with that.


    The downside of 3D is that it is still expensive and prices rise the larger your item is.

    I found my Design/Print person on the peopleperhour.com freelancers website.

    footrest6.jpg

    EndCaps3.jpg

    Shock_Cover.jpg

    ShockCoverBLack.jpg


  2. #2
    Pretty neat stuff, and thanks for such a comprehensive reply and illustrations, very useful.

    Just out of curiosity to help me get a perspective on the price, what did the foot rest cost you to design and make?

  3. #3
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    The Footrest was GBP £70

    Produce an .STL from my Spec. Print in ASA Material.

  4. #4
    Great, Thanks Steve

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