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Thread: Nova for Sale

  1. #51
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    Interesting that the spots appear under the wrap, I always assumed that the paint itself somehow reacted with the fibreglass/gelcoat to 'bubble up'.

    I would be prepared to get a 'proper' paint job on my car if I was confident that I wouldn't get the 'spots' issue, or the movement/bleed issue that Dave describes ... for the first few years at least.

    It's possible, because Alistair's paint job has held up.
    There are probably numerous factors and no easy answers here.

  2. #52
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    Itís called osmosis. Anything fibreglass can in theory get it, and itís all down to the original preperation.
    Mine had it bad when I first found it and hoped that with a professional respray it would be cured. The guy who picked it up was the person that was going to have to respray the car. He was dreading it but also said it would come back at some stage.
    As soon as I saw it in my car over a year ago my heart sank and knew I had lost interest in the car. The paint was perfect, but in some areas it was now getting bad , and slowly over the whole body. It would only get worse and then I would be embarrassed to show it.
    Who bought the car I truly donít really care . I got what I wanted and they now have to create the car I used to have, which wonít be easy or cheap.

  3. #53
    Owners Register Admin & Euro-Nova Supporter BlueNova's Avatar
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    Osmosis in grp boats tends to be worst below the waterline ... I wonder if the Novas which are affected have ever sat outside for long periods? .... My Nova has spent most of it’s life in a garage.

    Alistair

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueNova View Post
    Osmosis in grp boats tends to be worst below the waterline ... I wonder if the Novas which are affected have ever sat outside for long periods? .... My Nova has spent most of itís life in a garage.

    Alistair
    If you look at the beginning of my build you will see that I found my car living outside and had been for a good couple of years.

  5. #55
    Mine lives in a garage (damp as any Cornwall air) and develops the spots over the winter, always the one of the jobs needed before Stones.......
    It's a 52 year old car and everything works, just not always at the same time.......and it's probably about to get jealous!
    *Donate to Euro-Nova today!*

  6. #56
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    I have just been googling.
    So the working theory is that Alistair's car does not suffer from Osmosis because it was painted very early in its lifespan before the Osmosis set in(?)

    Dave's car lived in a garage *most* of its life (before being painted), it wasn't out in all weathers. So that car does not have spots/issues.

    BUT if you have purchased a 'basket-case' project (i.e. a bodyshell that has been sitting in the open for years), when you come to paint it, you will have bubbles appearing within a couple of years, as the Osmosis will have already occurred in the bodyshell.

    Just trying to understand this to make an informed decision about my car.

    Osmosis does not explain the 'bleed-through' issues that Dave had with his car. I guess that is another story...

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    I have just been googling.
    So the working theory is that Alistair's car does not suffer from Osmosis because it was painted very early in its lifespan before the Osmosis set in(?)

    Dave's car lived in a garage *most* of its life (before being painted), it wasn't out in all weathers. So that car does not have spots/issues.

    BUT if you have purchased a 'basket-case' project (i.e. a bodyshell that has been sitting in the open for years), when you come to paint it, you will have bubbles appearing within a couple of years, as the Osmosis will have already occurred in the bodyshell.

    Just trying to understand this to make an informed decision about my car.

    Osmosis does not explain the 'bleed-through' issues that Dave had with his car. I guess that is another story...
    I think like many of these anomalies it is hard to work out a hard and fast rule. My latest Nova was in white gel coat when I got it and in very poor order. I stored the shell in my front garden and encouraged shrubs, climbers and trees to grow over it/around it and through it to help disguise it. EventualLy the garden fence blew over and cracked a section behind the roofline. The gel coat was scratched and cracked in many places, including all arches from time spent stored sideways strapped to a wall! I havenít suffered the blisters but do get shadow lines/ bleeding as David refers to.

    I am well aware of osmotic blisters as in the day job our business inspects cold water tanks and manages legionella risks. The blisters are an issue on GRP tanks on the inside surface - once formed they often split/leak so pockets of water sit in them allowing bacterial growth locally which may contaminate the stored water.
    All the best,

    Jim

    Club Nova Member, SDBC Member, GRRC Member, Southern Classics



    Read more about latest Nova developments in Complete Kit Car

  8. #58
    Owners Register Admin & Euro-Nova Supporter BlueNova's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    I have just been googling.
    So the working theory is that Alistair's car does not suffer from Osmosis because it was painted very early in its lifespan before the Osmosis set in(?)

    Dave's car lived in a garage *most* of its life (before being painted), it wasn't out in all weathers. So that car does not have spots/issues.

    BUT if you have purchased a 'basket-case' project (i.e. a bodyshell that has been sitting in the open for years), when you come to paint it, you will have bubbles appearing within a couple of years, as the Osmosis will have already occurred in the bodyshell.

    Just trying to understand this to make an informed decision about my car.

    Osmosis does not explain the 'bleed-through' issues that Dave had with his car. I guess that is another story...
    Steve,

    If your Nova doesn't currently have any signs of osmosis then I'd personally go for it and do a top class paint job, but I think you're still having 'ratty' thoughts.

    Anyway, you'll have an idea of the history of your car (ie it was previously in a garage due to be restored by a magazine company I recall?) and if no osmosis has appeared before or since you got it, and you intend to keep it garaged (or in a 'Princess Trailer' ) then you should be ok.

    Alternatively, you could resort to your 'rat look' when you get her on the road, but in the meantime get an inconspicuous area (eg underside of front undertray?) painted asap so that you have lots of time to monitor any reaction before committing to the 1st class paint job your Nova deserves.

    Hope this helps!

    Alistair

  9. #59
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    Micro blistering is usually caused from a contaminated air line from the compressor, if the tank is not drained regularly especially with modern high revving compressors which create a lot of heat equalling warm air in the tank, if there are not sufficient water/oil separators in the system you get very fine water particles into paint which can sometime take some time to appear as blistering, also spraying in damp/humid conditions can also cause micro blistering. Compressors also produce an oil vapour again if the filtration is not there this will get into the paint. Another cause is poor preparation not allowing base primers to dry after wet flatting etc., I ran a body shop for over 15 years and used to have an old slow revving comp which never really produced any water vapour and used that for spraying and a modern one for air masks etc. Type of paint doesnít help cellulose is the worst as it doesnít have the resilience of 2k and will absorb moisture if not maintained (waxed/polished) and if kept in damp conditions an example of this is putting a non-breathable cover on a wet car or driving a wet car into a poorly ventilated garage and shutting the door, blistering is not confined to glass fibre a metal sub surface will do the same only difference there is you get micro rust spotting as well ,if you want to do an experiment get a piece of painted car panel and put a rag on it and leave it out In the shade outside so the rag will be like a wet poultice

    Mike

  10. #60
    Owners Register Admin & Euro-Nova Supporter BlueNova's Avatar
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    So put simply ...

    .... it could either be micro blistering of the paint or osmosis of the grp, and local close examination, possibly with some destructive testing, would be necessary to tell which one it is?

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